Partial List of Dublin Cemeteries and Burial Grounds

 

Glasnevin:  Originally called Prospect Cemetery Glasnevin the location name came into common usage in the early 1900s and it would be very difficult to find a Dubliner today who would call it by it's original name. This cemetry which is probably the largest in Ireland is used by all religious denominations although it would be fair to say that in the 1800s it was predominantly Catholics who were buried there. 

Dates. Opened in 1832 it is still in use.  Glasnevin Cemetery has a web site  www.glasnevin-cemetery.ie

Deansgrange:  On the south side of Dublin in a townland by the same name, like Glasnevin it was used by all denominations, in earlier days the the South and South West sections were predominantly used by the Protestant denominations, while the North was mainly Catholic

Dates.  Opened in 1865 it is still in use.   At time of writing Deansgrange has no web presence but can be contacted by phone at (your International access) + 353 1 2893416

Mount Jerome:  Another south side burial ground, much nearer the city centre than Deansgrange, situated at Harold's cross it was until the 1920s predominantly used by the Protestant denominations, now it is used by all.

Dates.  Opened in 1836 it is still in use.   At time of writing Mount Jerome has no web presence but can be contacted by phone at (your International access) + 353 1 4971269

Goldenbridge:  In the Inchicore area of the city it was originally used by Catholics but not exclusively so, it fell into disuse when Glasnevin opened, but remains an important inclusion on the list as it served much of the south city for it's short duration

Dates.   Opened in 1829 and essentially closed 40 years later except for those with burial rights, what records survive are now held by Dublin Corporation

Killbarrack:   On the north side of the city towards Howth, this is a very ancient burial ground and was probably in use back into the 16th century, used by all denominations.

Dates.   When Killbarrack was opened is not known for certain, probably sometime in the 1500s it is still in use for people with burial rights.  At time of writing Killbarrack is under the control of Fingal County Council which has a web presence at  www.iol.ie/~fincolib/ or can be contacted by phone at (your International access) + 353 1 4971269

Over the coming weeks more Burial Ground information will be added to this page, mail me if you have a specific query in the meantime